Can I Make My Own Contact Lens Solution?  

Unfortunately, the DIY trend has bled over to certain blog posts contacting recipes for DIY contact solutions. The short answer is no, you should never try to make your own contact lens solution. Here’s why:

All the ingredients in commercial contact lens solutions are sterile and made in a sterile environment. You can never replicate the sterile environment, nor acquire the sterile ingredients for making a DIY contact lens solution.

Saltwater is not saltwater. You can’t make proper contact lens solution simply by adding saltwater to regular household water or even distilled water. Commercial contact lens solution has a very specific ratio of salt to water. And, the salt is not the kind of salt you’d find available in grocery stores. It goes without saying that saline solution cannot be made with saltwater from the ocean, either.

Different Kinds of Contact Lens Solution

There are different kinds of contact lens solution; each one designed to meet specific needs.

Saline Solution

Saline solution is a saltwater solution that’s intended to be used for rinsing off your contact lenses. Over the course of a day, your contacts may get dusty or accumulate organic debris that is irritating to your eyes. When this happens, you can remove your contact lenses and rinse them safely with saline solution, which mimics the moisture formulation in your eyes. Note that commercial saline solution is pH-balanced and sterile.

Multi-Purpose Cleaning Solution

Multi-purpose cleaning solution is a chemical formulation that actually cleans your contact lenses. Your contacts may accumulate bacteria or other harmful elements that are irritating and/or dangerous for your eyes. Multi-purpose cleaning solution contains certain cleaning agents that kill bacteria in order to sterilize your contact lenses.

Contact lens solution is not expensive. Always use a well-known brand of commercial contact lens solution for your contacts. For recommended brands, contact Brookleigh Family Eyecare in Brookhaven.

 

Should My Teen Get Contact Lenses?

For millions of people who need glasses to see at their best, contact lenses have been a gamechanger. However, when your teen child decides they would prefer to have contact lenses over glasses, the request can naturally come along with a few concerns as a parent. Take a look at just a few of the things to consider as you decide whether your teenager could be a good candidate for contact lenses.

Does your teen follow instructions fairly responsibly?

Wearing contact lenses means cleaning hands before handling lenses, cleaning lenses before placing them, and removing lenses to give the eyes a rest are all necessary. The eye doctor will go over the instructions with your teen if they do prescribe contacts. If your child is generally good about following guidelines and instructions, contact lenses can work out well.

Has your teen had any issues with frequent eye infections?

Children and teens that have frequent issues with eye infections like pink eye (conjunctivitis), blepharitis, or styes, contact lenses may not always be the best option. Ongoing issues with eye infections may mean that your teen is more vulnerable to these infections or is experiencing something in their environment that is causing the infections. In either case, contact lenses could potentially irritate these infections.

Why does your teen want to get contact lenses?

The reason behind why the teen wants contacts should also be considered. For some, contacts eliminate concerns about how their glasses make them appear to their peers. For others, contacts may make it easier if they play contact sports. Before committing to contacts for the teen, be sure to discuss why they want to wear contacts to ensure there are viable reasons.

Talk to an Eye Doctor About Contact Lenses in Brookhaven, GA

In the end, contact lenses can really be valuable for some teens. If you believe your teen would be a good candidate for contact lenses, reach out to us at Brookleigh Family Eyecare in Brookhaven, GA.

Adjusting to new contact lenses

Adjusting to New Contacts: Tips for Success and When to Call the Eye Doctor for Help  

While contact lenses can be an attractive alternative to wearing glasses because they don’t change your appearance, contacts do also require a bit of an adjustment period. Most professionals will tell you that you can expect it to take as long as two weeks to get adjusted to your new lenses. Here is a look at a few tips to help smooth the transition to wearing contacts and when you may need a little extra help from your eye doctor.

Tips for Success

1. Plan ahead for time to relax for the first few minutes after lens placement.

The first few times you put your contact lenses in your eyes, it can cause a bit of irritation. This is perfectly normal. You will need a few minutes to get used to how the lenses feel in your eyes. So make sure you have enough time after lens placement to allow your eyes time to adjust.

2. Set alarms to remind you to clean and take out your lenses.

Once you get over the initial sensations of feeling the contact lenses in your eyes, you can forget that you have them on. Since you are not accustomed to taking lenses out, it can be a good idea to set a reminder or alarm on your phone so you’ll remember to take the lenses out and clean them as needed.

3. Take out the lenses for a rest when you need to.

Forcing yourself to wear your new contacts for long periods is not the key to getting used to them faster. It is much better to take the lenses out and give your eyes a rest when your eyes feel irritated or if you feel that your eyes need a break.

When to Call the Eye Doctor

  • If the contacts are actually causing your eyes pain
  • If you have a difficult time with your lenses after a few weeks
  • If the contacts always feel dry in spite of using moisturizing eye drops

Contact Your Brookhaven Eye Doctor for Help with New Contacts

When you get adjusted to your new lenses, it will feel like you get a life-changing way to better vision. If you need new contact lenses or have issues with the contact lenses you have, reach out to us at Brookleigh Family Eyecare in Brookhaven, GA so we can help.

After Cataract Surgery: How to Prepare for Recovery and What to Expect

Cataract surgery can make a major change for someone who has had their vision affected by this common problem. Here is a look at some of the things you can expect after surgery.

What to Expect Immediately After Cataract Surgery

Right after cataract surgery, you will talk to the doctor at the hospital or place of surgery before you go home. You will not be able to see very clearly out of the eye that the surgery was performed on; that is normal. This is why it is important that you have someone with you to drive you home. You may find it uncomfortable to have your eye exposed to light, so the medical staff may have you wearing a patch over the eye or dark sunglasses. Most people are home within hours of having the surgery.

Avoiding Problems Once You Get Home

When you do get home, it is a good idea to just sit and relax with your eyes closed for a little while. Your eye will need time to adjust to the newly placed lens, so trying to focus on anything like the television or a computer screen may be a bit uncomfortable. You may have a little discomfort, itching, or inflammation of the eye. make sure you avoid any strenuous activity in those first few days after surgery.

Stay Alert to Signs of Problems

Even though cataract surgery is considered to be one of the most effective and successful types of surgery, occasionally, some patients do have problems even though it is a rarity. It is good to know the signs that something is wrong so you can immediately reach out to the eye doctor for advice. A few signs that something could be wrong include:

  • Swelling and inflammation that persists beyond a few days
  • Severe itching sensations in the eye that don’t start to get better
  • Excessive pain or pressure in the eye that seems to be getting worse

It is also worth noting that a bit of blurry vision and lack of focus after cataract surgery is normal. However, you should see your vision clear up progressively as time passes. If you are not seeing improvements, it is best to speak to your doctor.

With a little prior planning and knowing what to expect, cataract surgery can be a seamless process. Reach out to us at Brookleigh Family Eyecare to schedule an appointment if you believe you have cataracts.

 

Are Cheap Reading Glasses Bad For My Eyes?

Many people find it difficult to see things very close up the older they get. Things like food labels, clothing tags can be impossible to read, and engaging in hobbies like sewing or reading becomes unmanageable without help. This often makes reading glasses necessary. In recent years, cheap reading glasses have become available without a prescription in discount stores. You may even be able to find a pair for just one dollar. But are cheap reading glasses safe to use?

Your Brain and Your Eyes Work Together

If you’ve ever needed to get prescription eyeglasses, you know that there’s a period of adjustment. That’s because your brain and eyes work in tandem to learn how to correctly see out of your eyeglasses. When you introduce cheap reading glasses to the , you may inadvertently confuse your brain and eyes to the point where your regular prescription eyeglasses don’t work as intended. A better option is to ask your eye doctor to prescribe bifocals or progressive lenses, both of which will eliminate any need for cheap reading glasses.

Cheap Reading Glasses Have Only One Magnification

The majority of people have different prescriptions in each eye. Cheap reading glasses that you buy off the shelf in discount stores have only one magnification in both eyes. While it may seem like you’re able to read better wearing cheap reading glasses, in reality, one eye is probably doing most of the work. Over time, this will result in an imbalance in the eyes, which could affect your vision permanently. For this reason, only use prescription reading glasses that have the correct prescription in each lens.

It’s not worth it to risk permanent vision problems just to save a few dollars. Talk to your eye doctor about your near vision needs and get the quality prescription eyewear that you—and your eye—deserve.